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Art at Site 	www.moscowart.info	Mikhail 	Shemyakin	The Children, Victims of Adult Vices
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Mikhail Shemyakin

The Children, Victims of Adult Vices

2001
Bolotnaya Square
Website
www.occultpopagenda.blogspot.nl:
The children - victims of adult vices is a group of sculptures created by Russian artist, Mikhail Shemyakin, located in a park in Bolotnaya Square, Moscow, 2000 feet south of the Kremlin behind the British Ambassador's residence. Shemyakin said that, "[The sculpture] ... was conceived and carried out by me as a symbol and a call to fight for the salvation of today and future generations."
The sculptures are of thirteen bronze figures, which depict the adult vices, such as alcoholism, drug addiction, and prostitution, that affect children. The figures are perceptibly closing in on two unaware playmates, a girl and a boy, with the centrepiece figure being 'Indifference'. The sculpture was unveiled in 2001 amid some controversy. Opposition to the sculptures by Muscovites forced the location to be changed and specialists felt it would harm children.

www.russiaroadways.blogspot.nl:
The children with their blindfolds cannot even see the vices around them, or that there is a ball to play with at their feet, or a book to read. Instead, they extend their hands out in the air to find each other, get oriented, find their way where? The book: Apparently, it is Fairy Tales by Alexander Pushkin, see www.worldcat.org, poet and writer with a social conscience. Thee Tales -- a work with political meanings, see Russia Beyond the Headlines, 2014 article by Ajay Kamalakaran at www.rbth.com.
These are not overtly theological, and perhaps totally secular, if there is really a difference. The word vice, however, is in the title, and does conjure ideas of morality, and value judgment, see www.etymonline.com. Exclusions: Rape or pornography, negligence in providing sustenance. Or are those side consequences of other vices?
These differ in interpretations. Each figure is identified in both English and Russian in the sculpture, but the designation may be awkwardly done in English, leading to the variations in discussions (example: designation Propaganda of Violence is literally etched in stone, but may be easier understood in the context as Promotion of Violence, because propaganda is simply marketing, promotion anyway, unless a particular political motivation is intended, and who knows, etc).

www.blog.selfarcheology.com: In May of 2008, I visited Russia for about a week. In Moscow, we went to see The Moscow Kremlin. To be honest, today I don't remember much about it, nor did I care much about it back then. But what left a huge impression on me was a group of sculptures we saw in a park in Bolotnaya Square, 2000 feet (610 meters) south of the Moscow Kremlin.
The composition is called "Children Are the Victims of Adult Vices," created by Russian artist Mihail Chemiakin. As its description says, it is a 15-figure composition intended by the author to be an allegory of the fight against the global Evil
. Mihail Chemiakin wrote to his future spectators:
"I created the sculptural composition Children are the victims of adults' vices as a symbol and a call for action to save the living and the future generations. For many years it has been declared and pathetically exclaimed: "Children is our future!" However, it would take volumes to write down all the crimes of the society against children. I, as an artist, call upon you with this work to turn your heads backwards to hear and behold all those sorrows and horrors our children have to suffer nowadays. All sensible and honest people should stop and think before it's too late. Don't be indifferent!"

www.wikipedia.org:
Children Are the Victims of Adult Vices is a group of bronze sculptures created by Russian artist Mihail Chemiakin. The sculptures are located in a park in Bolotnaya Square, Balchug, 2,000 feet (610 metres) south of the Moscow Kremlin behind the British Ambassador's residence.
The sculptures are of thirteen figures, which depict adult vices, such as alcoholism, drug addiction, and prostitution, that affect children. The figures are perceptibly closing in on two unaware playmates, a girl and a boy, with the centrepiece figure being 'Indifference'.
The sculpture was commissioned by then-Mayor Yuri Luzhkov and sponsored by the state-owned oil company Rosneft. It was unveiled in 2001 amid some controversy. Some Muscovites worried that the graphic imagery would frighten children. Chemiakin said that, "[The sculpture] ... was conceived and carried out by me as a symbol and a call to fight for the salvation of present and future generations. www.occultpopagenda.blogspot.nl:
The children - victims of adult vices is a group of sculptures created by Russian artist, Mikhail Shemyakin, located in a park in Bolotnaya Square, Moscow, 2000 feet south of the Kremlin behind the British Ambassador's residence. Shemyakin said that, "[The sculpture] ... was conceived and carried out by me as a symbol and a call to fight for the salvation of today and future generations."
The sculptures are of thirteen bronze figures, which depict the adult vices, such as alcoholism, drug addiction, and prostitution, that affect children. The figures are perceptibly closing in on two unaware playmates, a girl and a boy, with the centrepiece figure being 'Indifference'. The sculpture was unveiled in 2001 amid some controversy. Opposition to the sculptures by Muscovites forced the location to be changed and specialists felt it would harm children.

www.russiaroadways.blogspot.nl:
The children with their blindfolds cannot even see the vices around them, or that there is a ball to play with at their feet, or a book to read. Instead, they extend their hands out in the air to find each other, get oriented, find their way where? The book: Apparently, it is Fairy Tales by Alexander Pushkin, see www.worldcat.org, poet and writer with a social conscience. Thee Tales -- a work with political meanings, see Russia Beyond the Headlines, 2014 article by Ajay Kamalakaran at www.rbth.com.
These are not overtly theological, and perhaps totally secular, if there is really a difference. The word vice, however, is in the title, and does conjure ideas of morality, and value judgment, see www.etymonline.com. Exclusions: Rape or pornography, negligence in providing sustenance. Or are those side consequences of other vices?
These differ in interpretations. Each figure is identified in both English and Russian in the sculpture, but the designation may be awkwardly done in English, leading to the variations in discussions (example: designation Propaganda of Violence is literally etched in stone, but may be easier understood in the context as Promotion of Violence, because propaganda is simply marketing, promotion anyway, unless a particular political motivation is intended, and who knows, etc).

www.blog.selfarcheology.com: In May of 2008, I visited Russia for about a week. In Moscow, we went to see The Moscow Kremlin. To be honest, today I don't remember much about it, nor did I care much about it back then. But what left a huge impression on me was a group of sculptures we saw in a park in Bolotnaya Square, 2000 feet (610 meters) south of the Moscow Kremlin.
The composition is called "Children Are the Victims of Adult Vices," created by Russian artist Mihail Chemiakin. As its description says, it is a 15-figure composition intended by the author to be an allegory of the fight against the global Evil
. Mihail Chemiakin wrote to his future spectators:
"I created the sculptural composition Children are the victims of adults' vices as a symbol and a call for action to save the living and the future generations. For many years it has been declared and pathetically exclaimed: "Children is our future!" However, it would take volumes to write down all the crimes of the society against children. I, as an artist, call upon you with this work to turn your heads backwards to hear and behold all those sorrows and horrors our children have to suffer nowadays. All sensible and honest people should stop and think before it's too late. Don't be indifferent!"

www.wikipedia.org:
Children Are the Victims of Adult Vices is a group of bronze sculptures created by Russian artist Mihail Chemiakin. The sculptures are located in a park in Bolotnaya Square, Balchug, 2,000 feet (610 metres) south of the Moscow Kremlin behind the British Ambassador's residence.
The sculptures are of thirteen figures, which depict adult vices, such as alcoholism, drug addiction, and prostitution, that affect children. The figures are perceptibly closing in on two unaware playmates, a girl and a boy, with the centrepiece figure being 'Indifference'.
The sculpture was commissioned by then-Mayor Yuri Luzhkov and sponsored by the state-owned oil company Rosneft. It was unveiled in 2001 amid some controversy. Some Muscovites worried that the graphic imagery would frighten children. Chemiakin said that, "[The sculpture] ... was conceived and carried out by me as a symbol and a call to fight for the salvation of present and future generations.